Random News about Breeding and Breeders

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Sparrow Castle
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Wed Oct 24, 2018 7:42 pm

For the first time, I bought into a yearling at the sales this year. There's a lot to learn when venturing into that area of the industry.

Hagyard Veterinarian Interview Reveals Questions About Manipulated X-Rays, Radiograph Reports
As the Kentucky Board of Veterinary Examiners (KBVE) considers what its next steps will be in the case of a dozen veterinarians who self-reported for modifying dates on radiographs, one surgeon's testimony before the board raises questions about the practice of vetting horses at sale.

Earlier this year, 12 veterinarians at Hagyard Equine Medical Institute in Lexington, Ky. reported themselves to the Board – some for altering dates on pre-sale radiographs bound for the repository at public auction, some for being aware the misdating was happening. The misdating came to light as part of an ongoing civil lawsuit between three Hagyard field care veterinarians and Hagyard partners over a deal to buy into the company.

The KBVE conducted interviews with the veterinarians who self-reported, as well as staff members at Hagyard to learn more about whether those vets were guilty of rule violations. Transcripts of those interviews, which are part of the public record, were recently uploaded onto the Kentucky Department of Agriculture's website.
More: https://www.paulickreport.com/news/ray- ... h-reports/
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Treve
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Wed Oct 24, 2018 9:49 pm

Congrats on the purchase would love to know more!
But ugh that is discouraging even if not altogether surprising...
A filly named Ruffian...

Eine Stute namens Danedream...

Une pouliche se nommant Trêve...

Kincsem nevű kanca...


And a Queen named Beholder
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Sparrow Castle
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Fri Oct 26, 2018 11:10 pm

Treve wrote:
Wed Oct 24, 2018 9:49 pm
Congrats on the purchase would love to know more!
But ugh that is discouraging even if not altogether surprising...
Thanks! We had our vet scan/examine her and he found a spot of calcification. He thought if we could get her cheap enough, we could take a chance with it (there were a few other babies our trainer was considering). I’m sure we’re not the only ones who found or heard about it because the bidding really stalled. We got her at less than half her stud’s fee, maybe good for us but not so good for the breeders.

I learned later that there were people dissing the breeders, saying things like their babies are wild because they’re never handled and other dumb stuff. I realize that keeping the liquor flowing can help sales prices, but it also makes people be stupid. It just doesn’t seem to me like the proper time for drinking, not until you’ve gotten your business done.

Our filly looked and acted very different after we got her back to the farm. She's quite entertaining and energetic, very friendly, and is already bossing around the colts in the paddock next door. She really is a sweet baby, and we’re having fun with her.

Our trainer was VERY particular about which specific person was going to “break” her (didn't know how much that mattered). She’s been ridden for the last few days now, but she wasn’t so sure about it at first. We’re also trying to teach her that peppermints and carrots are yummy treats!

It’s a very different experience starting with a yearling and our journey’s just begun. Y’all with more sales and yearling experiences can disagree with my impressions so far, or maybe this is all second nature to you. But three big takeaways for newcomer me: Buyer Beware, Stay Off the Booze, Keep Your Cards Close to Your Vest. I suppose I could add a fourth, Keep Your Ears Open, with skepticism intact.
BaroqueAgain1
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Fri Oct 26, 2018 11:36 pm

IMHO, 'Buyer Beware, Stay Off the Booze, Keep Your Cards Close to Your Vest & Keep Your Ears Open' is good advice no matter what you're buying. ;)
lurkey mclurker
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Sat Oct 27, 2018 6:41 pm

Sparrow Castle wrote:
Fri Oct 26, 2018 11:10 pm


Our trainer was VERY particular about which specific person was going to “break” her (didn't know how much that mattered). She’s been ridden for the last few days now, but she wasn’t so sure about it at first. We’re also trying to teach her that peppermints and carrots are yummy treats!
LOL I'm helping start a three-year-old very smart 3/4 Morgan filly and after her uneventful first ride (she turned her head, looked at me, looked back down the arena rail and just walked on) she decided for her second ride that she would lie down in the middle of the arena. With me on her, of course. :lol:
BaroqueAgain1
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Sat Oct 27, 2018 7:17 pm

"...she decided for her second ride that she would lie down in the middle of the arena. With me on her, of course. "

How passive-aggressive. :P :lol:
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Sparrow Castle
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Sat Oct 27, 2018 7:22 pm

lurkey mclurker wrote:
Sat Oct 27, 2018 6:41 pm
Sparrow Castle wrote:
Fri Oct 26, 2018 11:10 pm


Our trainer was VERY particular about which specific person was going to “break” her (didn't know how much that mattered). She’s been ridden for the last few days now, but she wasn’t so sure about it at first. We’re also trying to teach her that peppermints and carrots are yummy treats!
LOL I'm helping start a three-year-old very smart 3/4 Morgan filly and after her uneventful first ride (she turned her head, looked at me, looked back down the arena rail and just walked on) she decided for her second ride that she would lie down in the middle of the arena. With me on her, of course. :lol:
That's hilarious! Our filly just kept looking back at her rider and didn't want to move forward. It was like she was wondering what he thought he was doing back there. She was also a little vocal. He was okay with just sitting on her until she was ready to move, which she did eventually.
lurkey mclurker
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Sun Oct 28, 2018 6:30 pm

Yeah our filly was totally calm & fine and she had been walking and stretching her neck down on a long rein, so at first I thought nothing of it - fortunately she went down soooo slowly and carefully that I figured out what was going on and by the time she was down I was standing next to her, blocking her back so she couldn't roll. I just didn't want her to break the tree on my saddle, LOL... she got right back up when I urged her and looked at me like, what? This is where I usually roll! :lol:
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Mylute
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Sat Nov 03, 2018 10:30 am

Get To Know Sabrina Moore, Breeder of Knicks Go

https://www.americasbestracing.net/life ... -knicks-go
"You're only given a little spark of madness. You mustn't lose it."
~ Robin Williams 1951 - 2̶0̶1̶4̶ ∞
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Sparrow Castle
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Tue Nov 13, 2018 3:38 pm

Two Classic Winners Make Ingordo Hungrier for the Next
Alpha to omega, A to Z: few men can have achieved as exhaustive a grasp as David Ingordo of what turns an unbroken Thoroughbred into a champion. Or make that Z to A. For in Zenyatta (Street Cry {Ire}) and now Accelerate (Lookin At Lucky), an agent who is still only 42 can be credited with finding two Breeders’ Cup Classic winners as yearlings in nine years.

Zenyatta he famously picked out for just $60,000; Accelerate, also at the Keeneland September Sale, for $380,000. Anyone familiar with this intense and driven figure, his eyes burning into the raw animal before him, will acknowledge the professionalism that yielded these discoveries. But that does not alter the fact that both were made for people he views more or less as family–and whose joy duly compounded Ingordo’s sense of fulfilment, in business or career terms, with a highly personal satisfaction.
More: http://www.thoroughbreddailynews.com/tw ... -the-next/
Point Given
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Tue Nov 13, 2018 11:56 pm

Interesting article

https://www.paulickreport.com/features/ ... roughbred/
Several times over the past weeks, readers have commented on the look of the contemporary Thoroughbred in comparison with horses of past years. In particular, readers have noted that racers today appear to have lighter bone than the horses of yesteryear who raced so successfully season after season.

From my personal experience in measuring horses over the past decade and a half, I would concur there are differences between horses of today and those of 50 or 60 years past. From that past era, DataTrack has measurements of a sizable minority of horses, typically important racehorses, who were foaled in the 1960s and 1970s, as well as many more from more recent years.

The surprise, I suppose, is the difference in bone is not what an interested observer would expect.
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Sparrow Castle
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Wed Nov 14, 2018 1:14 am

Point Given wrote:
Tue Nov 13, 2018 11:56 pm
Interesting article

https://www.paulickreport.com/features/ ... roughbred/
Several times over the past weeks, readers have commented on the look of the contemporary Thoroughbred in comparison with horses of past years. In particular, readers have noted that racers today appear to have lighter bone than the horses of yesteryear who raced so successfully season after season.

From my personal experience in measuring horses over the past decade and a half, I would concur there are differences between horses of today and those of 50 or 60 years past. From that past era, DataTrack has measurements of a sizable minority of horses, typically important racehorses, who were foaled in the 1960s and 1970s, as well as many more from more recent years.

The surprise, I suppose, is the difference in bone is not what an interested observer would expect.
That is interesting. I really like Frank Mitchell's articles, loved the case he makes here but I'm not sure about his recommendations. Just for kicks, I scrolled back through the Winx thread and I may be seeing what I want to see but it looks to me like both her cannon and upper bones are shorter than the average horse, though her body is anything but light. I'll have to start watching for this more.
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Treve
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Wed Nov 14, 2018 3:30 am

Sparrow Castle wrote:
Wed Nov 14, 2018 1:14 am
Point Given wrote:
Tue Nov 13, 2018 11:56 pm
Interesting article

https://www.paulickreport.com/features/ ... roughbred/
Several times over the past weeks, readers have commented on the look of the contemporary Thoroughbred in comparison with horses of past years. In particular, readers have noted that racers today appear to have lighter bone than the horses of yesteryear who raced so successfully season after season.

From my personal experience in measuring horses over the past decade and a half, I would concur there are differences between horses of today and those of 50 or 60 years past. From that past era, DataTrack has measurements of a sizable minority of horses, typically important racehorses, who were foaled in the 1960s and 1970s, as well as many more from more recent years.

The surprise, I suppose, is the difference in bone is not what an interested observer would expect.
That is interesting. I really like Frank Mitchell's articles, loved the case he makes here but I'm not sure about his recommendations. Just for kicks, I scrolled back through the Winx thread and I may be seeing what I want to see but it looks to me like both her cannon and upper bones are shorter than the average horse, though her body is anything but light. I'll have to start watching for this more.
This was interesting, and also confirms something I've suspected/muttered for a long time. I never understood the fascination for big horses, nor do I think size is, in general, an advantage in most equestrian venues except perhaps weight pulling.
A similar article with attached studies surfaced a while back in the equestrian community about the limitations of a canon bone's circumference possible in any horse, yet breeding bigger horses (as well as with extra weight in terms of muscle mass) was producing more fragile show jumpers because once they exceed that max canon bone width in proportional height and other regards, the canon bone can no longer reliably support the horse itself over high impact sports, not to mention the weight of rider and tack.
A filly named Ruffian...

Eine Stute namens Danedream...

Une pouliche se nommant Trêve...

Kincsem nevű kanca...


And a Queen named Beholder
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Mylute
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Wed Nov 14, 2018 6:47 pm

Don't know where else to post this but RICHARD needs to pay up.

https://www.facebook.com/99585526908/po ... 048231909/
"You're only given a little spark of madness. You mustn't lose it."
~ Robin Williams 1951 - 2̶0̶1̶4̶ ∞
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Sparrow Castle
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Sat Dec 01, 2018 9:43 pm

Taking Stock: The Interconnectedness of Galileo and O’Brien
By Sid Fernando
Aidan O’Brien deftly maneuvered his silver Land Rover inside a covered round pen at Ballydoyle where a group of yearling fillies was being ridden single file against the perimeter wall. He drove surprisingly close to them, circling inside of them, observing and exchanging words with the riders, motioning with his right hand as he steered the vehicle with his left. “Alright Christopher, good man, good man; okay Eddie, good man, good man; alright James, good man, good man,” he said, on and on to each rider. The yearlings had arrived at Ballydoyle only two weeks ago after the breaking process at John Magnier’s Coolmore, and they were already comfortable with O’Brien’s SUV next to them. They were in the early stages of preparation for their 2-year-old seasons and were a little behind the four sets O’Brien had supervised from the Land Rover in larger outdoor paddocks earlier that morning. O’Brien knew them all, as he did every rider by name. Each horses’s pedigree was written on the saddle cloth, with the initials of the sire and the dam’s full name. Naturally, there were a lot of “Gs” for the Galileos.

In 2001, Galileo (Ire) (Sadler’s Wells) became the first of O’Brien’s six G1 Epsom Derby winners. The bay colt also won the G1 Irish Derby and the G1 King George VI and Queen Elizabeth Diamond Stakes on his way to being crowned the champion 3-year-old of Europe. “He was so genuine, it was unbelievable,” O’Brien recalled.
More: http://www.thoroughbreddailynews.com/ta ... and-obrien
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Sparrow Castle
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Wed Dec 05, 2018 8:57 pm

Some of the interesting tidbits among the results of the Tattersalls December Mares Sale:

Pearling (full sister to Giant’s Causeway and You’resothrilling) was bought by a partner for 2.4 million gns.

Pearling’s 4-year-old daughter, Ambrosia (Frankel, half to Decorated Knight), sold to WinStar for 1.3 million gns.

Beautiful Morning (Galileo) 5 year old daughter of Date With Destiny by George Washington (“the one and only conduit for the genetic legacy of the unforgettable George Washington”) will likely stay in Europe and be bred to Dubawi.

Phoenix Thoroughbreds spent 1,550,000gns on two lovely mares, but bought back dual G2 winner Signora Cabello for 900,000gns.

Glen Hill Farm sold Earring (Dansili) carrying her first foal by Lope De Vega for 925,000gns to Lord and Lady Lloyd Webber’s Watership Down Stud.

The Jackson’s Lael Stable bought 4 year old I’m So Fancy (by the unraced sire Rajj by Danehill) for 500,000gns and the plan is for her to remain in training in the states.

Pearling Heads Rousing Mares’ Session
More: http://www.thoroughbreddailynews.com/pe ... es-session
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Mylute
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Wed Jan 09, 2019 10:40 pm

Nadine Anderson Denied American Stud Book Privileges
Information obtained as a result of a thorough investigation led to The Jockey Club's determination that in some cases the breeding practices were not performed in accordance with the Principal Rules and Requirements of The American Stud Book.
In total, two registration certificates were revoked and six more that were in the process of being issued were cancelled, and those foals are ineligible for Thoroughbred registration.
https://www.bloodhorse.com/horse-racing ... privileges

~ Hmm...who is this?
"You're only given a little spark of madness. You mustn't lose it."
~ Robin Williams 1951 - 2̶0̶1̶4̶ ∞
lurkey mclurker
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Wed Jan 09, 2019 11:37 pm

Mylute wrote:
Wed Jan 09, 2019 10:40 pm
Nadine Anderson Denied American Stud Book Privileges
Information obtained as a result of a thorough investigation led to The Jockey Club's determination that in some cases the breeding practices were not performed in accordance with the Principal Rules and Requirements of The American Stud Book.
In total, two registration certificates were revoked and six more that were in the process of being issued were cancelled, and those foals are ineligible for Thoroughbred registration.
https://www.bloodhorse.com/horse-racing ... privileges

~ Hmm...who is this?
Clicking on the "Nadine Anderson" tag at the bottom of the article you linked to brings up two other BloodHorse articles in which she is referenced.
Nadine Anderson, co-owner and manager of Brazeau Thoroughbred Farms near Hemet, Calif.
Also: pp. 24-27 https://issuu.com/californiathoroughbre ... horaug2013
Last edited by lurkey mclurker on Wed Jan 09, 2019 11:46 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Sparrow Castle
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Wed Jan 09, 2019 11:44 pm

Oh dear. Yeah, last I heard, she was at Brazeau Thoroughbred Farms in CA. Probably not anymore. That was only a few years ago. This is bad news.
lurkey mclurker
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Wed Jan 09, 2019 11:54 pm

As I descend down into the google timesuck spiral... looks like she was at/DBA EF1 Farms - Brazeau was purchased/bought out apparently in 2017.
North Light and City Wolf are two other Adena Springs stallions that will be relocated to California.

In a deal handled by Andy Stronach, who is Frank Stronach's son, the two stallions will stand next season at EF1 Farms, which until Nov. 1 operated as Brazeau Thoroughbred Farms. The more than 80-acre operation was recently acquired by horse products businessman and breeder Eric Yohan.
https://www.bloodhorse.com/horse-racing ... california

Huh... omg is it possible this was where those Stronach broodmares in the online auction were from?!?!?
http://www.chrb.ca.gov/Stewards/Minutes ... _05_06.pdf
NADINE ANDERSON COMPLAINT (CASE NO. 18SA0071)
Owner Nadine Anderson appeared in office today along with her attorney Mark Boykin
(Woodland Hills CA). The complaint in matter reads as follows:
Owner Nadine Anderson is indebted to EF 1 Farms for board and care of (82) thoroughbred
race horses. Total $49,263.00.

Also present at the hearing were Horse Owner/Farm Owner Paul Brazeau and Eric Yohan
Knipe, who is in the process of purchasing EF 1 Farm from Mr. Brazeau, and Bookkeeper
Maria Delao. Owner Anderson, who previously managed the farm, recently removed
several dozen of her horses from the farm. Former licensee Danny Alameda, who has been
suspended for roughly 20 years, was mentioned as being involved in this matter, which was
a highly contentious and complicated hearing. Mr. Knipe indicated he was taking action in
civil court regarding other board bills and issues. After deliberation, the Stewards
recommended this matter be addressed in civil court. We subsequently dismissed this case
without prejudice. Nadine Anderson, who we suspended for failing to appear in this matter
before us (REF: 4/14/181) was reinstated in the following ruling after appearing here today.
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