Dog with spleen tumor

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FlyToTheStars
Posts: 166
Joined: Wed Dec 13, 2017 8:20 am

Wed Jan 08, 2020 10:52 am

Anyone experienced this?

My 11 yr old rotti developed diabetes last May and handled it pretty well until she got a severe pancreatitis late last year and recovered... just barely.

Lost weight and didnt eat much recently. I happened to lift her lips and noticed pale gums last Friday and took her in first thing Sat morning. Ran a bunch of bloodworks and urine culture. No ketones. Nothing weird on bloodwork except mild anemia and high liver count. Sent us home with high calories cans of food with concerns on her appetite. Ordered us back on Monday for xrays if no improvement over the weekend.

Not much improvement and got xrays first thing and 12cm by 5cm tumor found on spleen and a 3.8cm mass on left lung lobe. Likely cancer since mass on lung is also found. Lung itself maybe 2 to 3 months life expectancy but spleen can rupture anytime. Minor bleeding from tumor would explain her anemia. Bleed then clot whoch she would perk up then downhill again when bleeding renewed.

Its hard to even think of euthanisia since itll be the first I ever had done. I know her curtain is coming to close sooner than later. Looking back, I think diabetes could be the first symptoms to the spleen tumor since both organs have direct blood vessel connections. Aside diabetes, anyone have experience with the tumor in spleen?
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Kurenai
Site Admin
Posts: 1134
Joined: Thu Sep 12, 2013 7:01 pm

Wed Jan 08, 2020 9:07 pm

Spleen tumors are common with dogs. Did you also check her heart? Because quite often when there's a spleen tumor, there's also a heart tumor. It is possible to remove the spleen completely and it's not a complicated operation (even with older dogs), recovery time is relatively short - about two weeks.

If it would be my dog and she is otherwise in tip top condition I would probably try with the operation, it won't prolong her life because of the mass in the lung, but it will give her lots more quality. And you also don't risk a rupture which is very, very painful. While she's under the vet can also take a closer look at her other organs and depending on what he sees decide to not let her wake up anymore.

I generally suggest to every dog owner once the dog gets up there with the years to do a full blood panel and an ultrasound once a year (spleen tumors grow slowly). It won't do miracles, but it helps a lot to catch things early on (most vets usually just do blood work unless you specifically ask for an ultra sound too).

If you don't want the operation, or your vet advises against it: I would rather put her to sleep sooner than later. It's always better to do it even a few days too early rather than one day too late. I made the mistake once with one of my cats and I still can't forgive myself for it. I know it's really hard, especially if she seems so happy and fit. But that's the thing with spleen tumors, the dogs are usually symptom free, by the time they show symptoms it's already too late. Even worse some dogs never show symptoms and it just ruptures. Please don't risk a rupture with waiting too long, it would be horrible (I spare you details).

Finally, my most important recommendation is to talk with your vet and discuss options. But do it soon. I'm sorry that you have to go through this, I know how heart breaking it is to lose pets.
TapitsGal
Posts: 1063
Joined: Fri Sep 13, 2013 11:03 pm

Fri Jan 10, 2020 8:04 pm

My best friends elderly beagle was put down last April because of a spleen tumor but his was in danger of a life threatening hemorrhage as his tumor was already slowly bleeding...by the time we took him in, surgery wasn't an option(he was 18) and had we waited longer to let him go, it would've just prolonged his bleeding...I would never put an older dog through surgery as the risk of anesthesia is just to high and I would blame Myself if something happened while my dog was under and she didn't recover but that's just me and my personal choice...you have to weigh the option for what's best for your dog
stark
Posts: 5639
Joined: Thu Oct 03, 2013 9:55 am
Location: SoCal

Fri Jan 10, 2020 11:13 pm

If it doesn't appear that she's in any pain, I'd vote to just let her ride it out at age 11.
That's not all bad for a Rotti, right?
I've found it easier to tear up tickets at 8/1 instead of 8/5.
FlyToTheStars
Posts: 166
Joined: Wed Dec 13, 2017 8:20 am

Mon Jan 13, 2020 2:31 pm

stark wrote:
Fri Jan 10, 2020 11:13 pm
If it doesn't appear that she's in any pain, I'd vote to just let her ride it out at age 11.
That's not all bad for a Rotti, right?
She isnt showing any pain, but her breed is very stoic. I did ask the vet and she said no pain... That age of 11 is amazing for a rotti :)

I am watching her like a hawk to see for any signs of deterioration, if any she will be put down.
FlyToTheStars
Posts: 166
Joined: Wed Dec 13, 2017 8:20 am

Mon Jan 13, 2020 2:34 pm

TapitsGal wrote:
Fri Jan 10, 2020 8:04 pm
My best friends elderly beagle was put down last April because of a spleen tumor but his was in danger of a life threatening hemorrhage as his tumor was already slowly bleeding...by the time we took him in, surgery wasn't an option(he was 18) and had we waited longer to let him go, it would've just prolonged his bleeding...I would never put an older dog through surgery as the risk of anesthesia is just to high and I would blame Myself if something happened while my dog was under and she didn't recover but that's just me and my personal choice...you have to weigh the option for what's best for your dog
Wow. 18?! Props to you in giving her a great, long life.

Thats definitely understandable. My pup went through a lot over the years. TPLO, another blown knee, cyst under eyelid, diabetes and now this. That girl had been trucking along. It totally sucks that it is happening to her.
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